10th June 2008

A London-bound view shows the main building on the "down" side, which was built to a style similar as those at the first Bromley and Dover Priory stations. The "second-hand" canopies from the ill-fated Lullingstone station remain, but their corrugated metal valances were replaced by more intricate types during a 1988 station refurbishment. © David Glasspool


10th June 2008

Although the Kent Coast Electrification brought colour aspect lights to many areas between 1959 and 1962 inclusive, much of East Kent's signalling was left untouched, and mechanical operation with semaphores was retained. The eradication of these delightful semaphores, such as those seen in the above view at the London end of Canterbury East, seems to be included within "Phase 1" of Network Rail's East Kent Re-signalling for 2011. © David Glasspool


10th June 2008

The main "down" side buildings retain a smart fa├žade, neat brickwork, and a restored canopy, as a result of the restoration work which took place during 1988. Of note on the ground floor are the trademark LC&DR arched orange window frames, which are also readily viewable down the line at Faversham. © David Glasspool


3rd April 2021

As per its counterpart Canterbury West, the East station has become the recipient of a huge footbridge, equipped with lifts, to provide step-free access to the platforms. The structure somewhat dwarfs the original main building and is seen here at an advanced state of construction. © David Glasspool